Review! The Water Travelers: Heir of the Unknown by Daniel Waltz

A great new fantasy adventure aimed at the young adults market but enjoyable for adults too! 

Aaron and Madi are from different worlds but facing very similar problems – trying to find their way in the world in the face of parent pressure and increasing responsibilities.
Both characters are easy to sympathise with and the relationship that forms between them is very naturally written. Waltz has created a unique world and the way it links to ours is just a brilliant idea. He has also come up with a compelling scenario that urges the reader on to discover how Aaron will deal with his impossible situation.
Great twists and a good pace. An unmissable read.
It’s free! Get your copy here:

Review: The Lost Heirs, by A. Moran-Soley

Thanks Karin, I really appreciate it!

karin boutall

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When I saw “The Lost Heirs” on a blog, I decided to read this new author, A. Moran-Soley, and am delighted I did. The story is rich with suspenseful and intriguing descriptions that kept me turning pages. One of my favorites: “Long grasses waved back and forth in a peaceful way that reminded him of a snake being charmed.” The author creates a journey that glides effortlessly across sci-fi, historic, and realistic worlds.

The story begins when Eric, a British boarding school student, falls into the world of Elsha and discovers a prince who is desperately trying to find his brothers. Eric, along with his friends, commits to helping the prince and embarks on an adventure through worlds known and unknown.

I have respect for fiction writers. The task of creating memorable characters in a fictitious world is difficult and A. Moran-Soley excels at doing so in contemporary and unusual settings. Her…

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A threat and a promise!

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A without naming any names (obviously!) I find myself drawing far more on real life people for the bad characters in my book, than I do for the nice ones! Does anyone else have this experience?
Both of my current villains, Lowick and Galed, draw off the idea that appearances can be deceptive. They can be charming and appealing until their inner motives surface. I’ve known a lot of people like that over the years, male and female! These two characters are a bit of a homage to those special folk!

‘Mr Bickward had never stood out in any way or struck him as anything but ordinary. He was strict and had a glare like medusa, but most teachers did. He certainly didn’t fit the idea of the power hungry despot that Joel and Chase had described, but then again, how would a power hungry despot masquerading as a teacher behave? Eric thought back to a lesson of his that Mr Bickward had covered three weeks earlier. The man wore a suit and a tie, like most of the male teachers at Smith- Chigley, and he had taught them very enthusiastically. Eric and Corbin had sniggered secretly at Bickward’s hair – straight thick brown hair that was supposed to be slicked down in a side parting but sprung back up and waved about excitedly whenever he moved too fast. He had a thin face with angular cheekbones and large hazel eyes. Eric remembered overhearing a couple the girls giggling over how good looking he was but all in all he just seemed like any other teacher.’

‘A shadow fell across the table and answered the question for him in the shape of a girl a couple of years older than the two boys. She wore a cream blouse and lacy waistcoat with a bulky layered skirt and brown boots but most striking was a tightly lace collar around her neck that fanned out into a large ruff. At first glance it gave the eerie impression that her head was on a plate floating above her body! She smiled tightly at Eric nodding her head briefly at Corbin so that the dark red curls piled up on top her pixie face wobbled about dangerously.’

Buy online at Amazon to read more:
The Lost Heirs: The first story of Eshla by A. Moran-Soley http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00NJX2DQY/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_gk4Wub0S38793

What is Eshla?

The short answer: the world Eric Grayson finds himself in, after being pulled through the Jarmuthe Chasm.

In a bit more detail – Eshla is divided into roughly four regions: The Jarmuthe region is mainly meadows, moors, hills and dales with some forest. A large proportion of the plants used to power Eshla come from here.

Jarmuthe

The Cedwigod region, is mainly forest with cities and houses built into the trees. A green, energetic light flows around these beautiful homes. Anna lives here in the lively city of Pren.

Cedwigod

The Caregon region, is the hardest land – mainly rocks and stone but the mysterious Bel-Arayba cave lays at the heart of it.

Bel Arayba Caregon

Finally, the Elgion region, is made up of salt water and numerous water-islands with elegant canals.

Elgion

At the center of all this is Hendref, the royal city, with its unusual skyline of distinctly shaped buildings, in a warm butter coloured stone, and flying machines which weave in between them. Hendref is covered in copper and brass pipes and mysterious humming machines.  This is where the Arwain family have their home: Hendref Castle.

To explore further, purchase ‘The Lost Heirs’, the first Eshlan adventure.

Two very different books by the same author.

I’ve just been introduced to Lulu – or, more specifically, http://www.lulu.com. I’d almost forgotten there are other online bookshops, besides Amazon! Anita Kovacevic has two books published on there in two contrasting genres.

The first, is Winky’s Colours.

A beautifully illustrated story, which follows Winky, the adorable penguin, on his quest for colour. Along the way he discovers danger, friendship and oodles of cuteness! Younger children will love this book, the illustrations are so appealing – forget Pingu, Winky should have his own TV station!

As a teacher and a parent (albeit of a 17 year old teenager!) this book had several elements I really appreciated. Anita Kovacevic is an educator who really understands how to engage children. The book is punctuated with questions and little tasks that raise this above a basic storybook, for example: Can you describe Winky’s family? Can you draw them? Who is your favourite?

I can imagine a parent and child on a rainy weekend, sat at their dining room table, reading this story and working through the various activities, questioning and exploring together.

This will help children develop reading skills that older children are often lacking. I cannot recommend it enough to parents.

winky

Buy Winky’s Colours here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/anita-kovacevic/winkys-colours/paperback/product-22000468.html

 

The second book was ‘The Threshold.’

Original and gripping from the first page. I wish I’d waited till the next day to start this, I couldn’t really afford the late night! I defy anyone to stop reading, ‘The Threshold’ once they start.

The mysteriously tantalising opening chapter introduces the legend of ‘The House’ and captivates the reader from that point on.

The main character in the first part, Josephus Clarence Thibedeaux III, is elegantly created in a style reminiscent of Charles Dickens: ‘and proceeded to hide his falsehood and ego under smooth eloquence, well-mannered posture and gentlemanly elegance.’ He is responsible for both the building of the house and the mystery that surrounds it. Years later, and a host of fascinating individuals take on the legend.

The story is filled with twists and turns, which culminates in an ultimately satisfying ending.

Anita Kovacevic is a skilled writer with a well-paced plot and beautifully crafted phrases: ‘Mrs Poole’s pride was her most precious possession, and she wasn’t going to roll it out like a rug for ruthless people to walk all over.’

Recommended to anyone who likes mysteries, thrillers, suspense and wonderfully written prose.

threshold

Buy The Threshold here:

http://www.lulu.com/shop/anita-kovacevic/the-threshold/ebook/product-21998977.html

Playing with the blurb…

How do you find a key that’s hidden in history itself? How do you defeat an evil tyrant, if he’s your own headmaster? How do four modern teenagers blend in to a 1920’s British boarding school?

Eshla is a steampunk, fantasy world of flying machines, mechanical contraptions and gleaming copper pipes, divided into four diverse regions and struggling to deal with its past.

Eric Grayson is an ordinary fourteen year old school boy, oblivious to the dangerous adventure waiting for him at the bottom of the school field.

The incredible request made of Eric sends him, his three close friends, and a fluffy blue sausage-loving creature from Eshla, searching through time on a mission of mercy.

A five star Amazon.com review: “Her writing reminded me of Harry Potter, The Chronicles of Narnia and even Dr. Seuss”

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00NJX2DQY

Book recommendation

The Land of Dragor: Book 1: The Gift of Charms (Land of Dragor 1) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1782199241/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_no8Uub0Z63PM5

A great start to an epic new series.
The Land of Dragor: the gift of charms by Julia Suzuki far surpassed my expectations.
It follows the story of Yoshiko, a baby dragon born to the Nephan clan. Yoshiko’s parents just want to be like any other normal dragon, but as he grows, Yoshiko himself becomes aware that he is special. He must decide whether to seek out his destiny – breaking the rules when necessary, or keep his head down and try to get through fire school without being bullied!
This is the first book about dragons I have ever read and I was surprised at how easy it was to feel connected to the the lives of these creatures. Julia Suzuki has created a fascinating world with instantly recognisable personalities that the reader quickly comes to care about. I found it hard to put the book down and, instead of reading it slowly over a week, ended up losing a big chunk of my weekend!
I recommend this to a much wider readership than just fans of fantasy – it has a strong ‘coming of age’ feel to it and explores relationships too – and believe it will be enjoyed by all age groups.
I’m looking forward to the sequel. 😁

The Big Push!

This is a shameless request for advice from indie authors everywhere. Now my first book has a cover I love and is being properly proof-read, and my second book is going through the same process, I’ve started looking seriously at the best ways to market them.

The problem is, I’m drowning in options! Amazon select, Goodreads promotions, Bookdaily.com, Bookbub, facebook promotions and about 300 twitter promotion offers! Does anyone have any advice about what works and what should be avoided? Most of all, I’d like to know if anyone has tried thebookpromoter.com. They sound amazing, but then they all do!

Any feedback gratefully received!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00NJX2DQY

The new cover is here!

‘The Lost Heirs’ finally looks like a real book thanks to the wonderful Renee at The Cover Counts. http://thecovercounts.com/

The whole process was so simple and affordable, I really recommend this company. They offer a range of prices, depending on what you need and you can completely personalise your package. I probably wasn’t the easiest customer as I had such a strong idea of what I wanted, but Renee was able to work with that and produced the cover that was in my head! It was certainly worth it – I feel a lot more confident about promoting my novel now. I’m getting the second book’s cover done next month, exciting days!

So, now I’m just waiting for the Amazon review process and then there’ll be no stopping me!

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